Our Future

 

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According to my records, we’ve only had two days since the Solstice under 100°, but the mornings have been fairly cool from first light until 9:00 a.m. This morning was no exception, simply a beautiful Sabbath.

We’ve kept our replacement heifers close to the corrals since they were weaned in May and June, waiting for their Bangs vaccination for Brucellosis and second round of shots, deworming and fly control that has entailed pumping water daily. We’ve had a lot of eye problems due to foxtails and some foot rot due to bacteria encouraged by the wet spring. Having them close by has helped us gather for doctoring.

We think this year’s heifers are exceptional, both in genetics and temperament. They have gotten to know the Kubota since they were calves, and then again when it brought hay everyday to the weaning pen. So we utilize the Kubota when we gather—they come to it naturally.

Saturday, after Friday’s processing, I led the bunch off the dry feed and irrigated pasture, fed some hay, ready to open them to 300 more acres of dry feed and another source of water, our irrigation pond. By this morning, they were exploring the shore of the pond when I arrived to see how they were doing. Naturally, they all gravitated to the Kubota to discover tall, untouched green feed in the spillway of the pond where excess water flows back into the Kaweah River.

Followers of this blog know it’s all about the girls, our prejudice for females—after all we are a cow/calf outfit. Though we were quite pleased with our steers, it’s not about bragging rights as to how big or nice they were in the sales ring—just an annual dividend, they pay our bills. It’s about the girls, two-thirds of which, with a little luck, will be with us for ten years. They become our future.

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3 responses to “Our Future

  1. John,
    Well said! The gals keep us in business through drought and moist years. I am glad you got a great set to roll into the cow herd. We are extremely dry in northeast Wyoming, 5.34 inches of moisture since January 1st. Cottonwood tree leaves are normally quart jar lid size, but this year are the size of quarters. Takes a creative-cow man to stay in business some years. Thank you for sharing your ranch story!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m sure you have your own story to tell, as do most cattle families in the West trying to get along with the weather. Thanks so much for reading ours and for your comment.

      Like

  2. The hind legs of the brown (red) one, glow like manzanita below the black

    Like

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