March Bloom 2013

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Midday March 10th, two days after four days’ accumulation of 0.27″ on Dry Creek, a little moisture remains. We don’t anticipate a great wildflower year with precipitation well-below normal. On my tour of Greasy with salt and mineral, a few beg for their pictures to be taken, nevertheless.

California Golden Poppy

California Golden Poppy

Manzanita

Manzanita

Wild Cucumber

Wild Cucumber

Baby Blue Eyes

Baby Blue Eyes

Gooseberry

Gooseberry

Common Brodiaea

Common Brodiaea

Fiddleneck

Fiddleneck

Popcorn Flowers

Popcorn Flowers

Mustard

Mustard

Bird's Eye Gilia

Bird’s Eye Gilia

Tree Lupine

Tree Lupine

Johnny Tuck

Johnny Tuck

Seep Monkeyflower

Seep Monkeyflower

White Clover

White Clover

Bird's Foot Trefoil

Bird’s Foot Trefoil

Minature Lupine

Minature Lupine

Pale Owl's Clover

Pale Owl’s Clover

Purple Owl's Clover

Purple Owl’s Clover

Western Redbud

Western Redbud

Pretty Face

Pretty Face

Pretty Face

Pretty Face

Yellow Pincushion

Yellow Pincushion

Wallflower

Wallflower

Indian Clover

Indian Clover

Pineapple Weed

Pineapple Weed

Fillaree

Fillaree

Fiesta Flower

Fiesta Flower

Tidy Tips

Tidy Tips

Scorpionweed

Scorpionweed

Goldfields

Goldfields

Tomcat Clover

Tomcat Clover

Lacepod

Lacepod

Foothill Poppy

Foothill Poppy

Headed Gilia

Headed Gilia

Brewer's Lupine

Brewer’s Lupine

Pipe Stem Clematis

Pipe Stem Clematis

Chia

Chia

8 responses to “March Bloom 2013

  1. Pingback: Young Bucks | drycrikjournal

  2. Pingback: Pretty Face | drycrikjournal

  3. Hi,

    Every one of these photos is gorgeous. I’ve never seen most of these flowers but I really admire the Miniature Lupine. Lacepod, and Golden Poppy.

    Fabulous wildflower display!

    Take care!

    ~Cathy~

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    • Thanks, Cathy. It’s been a wonderful exercise on more normal springs (when the cattle are making it on their own) learning to identify the wildflowers that I live here while honing my photographic skills at the same time, especially with a macro lens. Trying to pay attention to details, each flower can present itself differently, and thereby evoke feelings that are subtly different. I try to stay objective to be true to others looking to identify something new, but for me, there’s a just little more to it than that. Thanks again.

      Like

  4. beautiful photos of those flowers. Interesting, I don’t think we have any of those around here (near Freeport Texas) except (maybe) the (white)clover. It looks the same but I don’t know for sure the exact type we have. I have clematis vines that grow all over my yard like weeds, but it doesn’t look like yours. I think mine is called August Max clematis. I wish I knew how to get rid of it. It’s got beautiful white flowers when it blooms (in August), but the rest of the year it climbs all over and covers up everything else. It’s impossible to keep it down. Is yours the same way?

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