Tag Archives: photography

LOST FRIEND GONE

 

 

The canyon quiet by the fourth dawn, heads buried
beneath the waves of blond dry grasses, behind spears
of wild oats arching empty husks, first-time mothers

grazing like we expect our perfect world to be.
No plaintive calls, no searching draws, no panicked
pleading to canyon walls for their weaned calves

they have almost forgotten. We are relieved
of guilt, unburdened from their guttural mourning,
the harsh cacophony of maternity, of eighty

broken bonds rasping, wild wailing around us.
Aging skin grows thin imagining the magic
of companionship delivered from the womb,

of nursing, of mothering the first-born and losing it.
Emptiness and sorrow for a lost friend gone,
these cows giving voice to my unusual confusion.

 

NO RETREAT

 

 

Spring lingers into May, empty
blue clouds in a pink sea at dawn—
an ancient armada claiming sky,

this canyon that yesterday’s Navy jets
left thundering, practicing, maneuvering
for war. Here along the shrinking creek

Egrets and Killdeer wade, we measure
global tension, hear its roar, primitive
and deafening with no retreat.

 

HARVEST

 

 

Two sections of grass,
twenty-four tons on the hoof
leaving for your plate.

 

SHIPPING DAY

 

 

A season teeters
on the beam, calves condensing
strong grass on the hoof.

 

Wagyu X Calves

 

 

It doesn’t seem all that long ago (mid-September), when our first-calf heifers began calving with no real rain until mid-November, and only 3 inches through the end of February, one of the driest starts to our rainy season on record. We fed a lot of hay and fortunately we had some dry feed leftover from the year before, but a tough start for a two-year old, first-time mother and calf.

Thursday morning, these steer and heifer calves leave for Connell, Washington for Agri-Beef’s Snake River Farms’ program to be marketed as American Kobe Beef where they’ll be fed for 400-500 days. This is our second load of Wagyu X calves and typically we take the calves from their mothers, weigh and sort steers from heifers, then load them immediately onto the truck. However, since we’ve increased the number of cows that we breed to the Wagyu bulls, the first-calf heifers are pastured in two different fields two miles away from our loading corrals and scales that requires us to haul the calves. Half of the calves pictured above were weaned Monday, the balance yesterday as they wait for the truck.

Weaning is a stressful time in a calf’s life, and stress can be measured in pounds, and hence in dollars. It can also leave them susceptible to various respiratory problems. For these calves, this is not an ideal scenario, but temperatures are relatively cool and we’ve sprinkled the dust down, hoping for the best as we feed good alfalfa hay morning and night.

The rule of thumb for the time to wean an English calf is a week, but over the years we’ve noticed that after three or four days they’ve forgotten their mothers. Compared to our English calves weaned off mature cows, the Wagyu X calves generally weigh about 200 pounds less, but their mothers at two years old put on another 200-300 pounds while raising their Wagyu X calves. Quite remarkable, when 30 years ago we wouldn’t breed a replacement heifer until she was two to avoid calving problems or stunting her growth—all due to genetic improvements.

Assuming weight is a measure of stress, I don’t believe the calves will lose that much weight. What may be a pricy experiment, we weighed the calves off the trailers to compare to the shipping weights Thursday morning to prove or disprove our hypothesis. We’ll see.

 

ANOTHER PURPOSE

 

 

Ants in the anthill, we feel the quake
of giant footfalls, cloven hooves
and rubber tread approaching, yet

stick to the business of our survival
unabashed, sorting the wild grain
packed by caravans for winter’s cold.

Our one mind is not cluttered
with news beyond our borders,
the fallen oak and swollen creek—

of all the peripheral shenanigans
delegated to orators and generals,
to pundits and playwrights busy

with dramatic scripts to entertain
themselves. We serve another purpose
dedicated to feeding ourselves.

 

VIOLENCE

 

 

                                                                                Why do we
                    invite the world’s rancors and agonies
                    Into our minds though walking in a wilderness?

                              – Robinson Jeffers (“Going to Horse Flats”)

All the props in place, the stage is ever-set
for calamities, for the struggles for power,
for deceit in scripts yet unwritten, but predictable.

                    Two Red Tails strafe a passing eagle
                    reluctantly retreating to a steep hillside
                    to stand his ground, claim his space

                    to face their withdrawal. We watch snakes
                    squeeze and swallow one another whole
                    as the bobcat waits upon the tailings of a burrow—

this world, and that beyond it, turns on violence
despite our protests, despite our compromises,
despite the logic of compassion to dissuade it long.

 

MOTHER’S DAY

 

 

Flash of tender bloom
for a single day each year
when we remember.

 

“Let the Mothers Decide to Make War”

 

EARLY SURVEILLANCE

 

 

When awaking barefoot in the dark,
we try to keep the reptiles out
of the house and our hazy dreams

knowing that if tree frogs can slip
through the cracks beneath our doors,
so might the snakes investigating

their whereabouts or ours. As early
surveillance from the underworld,
the Natives let the rattlesnake be—

to help keep everyone honest
by dispatching the evil among them.
Best be good, but keep your eyes peeled!

 

ANDY HEDGES & FAMILY

 

 

Amid gathering and shipping our first load of Wagyu X calves, we enjoyed the company of Andy, Alissa, Maggie Rose, Jubal and Josiah Hedges before they headed to Santa Cruz where Andy will play at Flynn’s Cabaret tomorrow night (May 11th), 8 p.m.

Jubal’s first step out of the car was toward a freshly transplanted flower to give to his mother Alissa. (I’m told there’s damn few flowers in West Texas.) Maggie Rose spent an afternoon in the ‘sip and dip’ training a young bullfrog while Josiah kept busy looking for something new to get into. Andy, Alissa and Robbin sang while swapping guitars until midnight—many delightful hours with a wonderful family we will cherish for a long time.