TWINING BRODIAEA

 

 

Our native feed germinated early at the end of October, and by Thanksgiving the rains came, six days at a time spaced with six days of gray. A fairly warm winter with few days below freezing, the grass grew, and by March, there was little room for wildflower bloom to compete for sunlight.

Exceptions are the yellow cascades of Bush Monkeyflowers and the purple Winecups or Farewell to Spring, both now showing spectacularly around Lake Kaweah. While looking for strays yesterday, this Twining Brodiaea caught my eye.

 

Rising from the earth,
heavy head climbing for light,
no two knots the same.

 

2 responses to “TWINING BRODIAEA

  1. We have wild grapevines (at least that’s what I think they are) or some other sort of vine in the park where I walk. I love to take photos of their shapes and knots.

    janet

    Like

  2. Exactly why seeds last for years, awaiting their proper time to appear.

    Like

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